Monday, February 8, 2016

Reader Question 3

 

Welcome back to a series based on the answers to your questions! Because of my priorities in family, ministry, and work, I can’t answer individual emails, but I sure do love when it’s time to ask for questions so that I can answer them here for the whole community. Thanks for being so understanding!

New questions keep rolling in through the comments and email. I’ve got several more to answer right now, but you’re invited to send yours as long as the series lasts. They’ve all been great questions that I’m sure we all have. Here’s the latest…

When speaking to an audience, the greatest hurdle I have to effective message sharing is feeling stuck to my notes and not free to communicate the message in a clear and cohesive way without glancing down desperately trying to figure out what comes next. I don’t struggle with stage-fright at all, and when I’m telling a story, I’m fine! But I sometimes have a hard time getting the message *inside* me during my prep time, so I can speak it out like I believe what I’m saying. (Because I do!)

I’m okay with looking down at my notes at keywords or phrases ever so often, but when I feel unnatural, it stirs a stress inside me, even in the middle of a talk! Practicing helps for sure, but it’s like there’s this mental block, hampering the message from truly sticking in my heart and mind beforehand, no matter how much I truly believe in the message. How do I help the heart of the message stick to my own heart before delivering it?   ~ Amanda

First, I’m so glad you said you’re ok with using notes. This is such a personal preference, but I don’t mind listening to/watching a speaker who uses their notes–even heavily. For example, I love David Jeremiah’s preaching, but he stands behind a podium and almost reads his sermons. It doesn’t bother me a bit! I’ve put less pressure on myself since I realized this even though I’m in awe of speakers who don’t use notes. Personally, I’m shooting for an in-between. Eye contact is so powerful that I want to use them as little as possible–more as a security blanket than a crutch.

But that’s not really your question! :) Here’s my guess… (although I may not be right.) I’m thinking that you may need to work on streamlining your messages. When I first started speaking, my messages were complex and heady. I got lots of “that was a great message” kinds of compliments, but I had problems getting through them without lots of references to my notes. If I had problems remembering all that I included, can you imagine how my audiences felt? They may have been impressed by how much I included, but I doubt it stuck with them long enough to change their lives much.

My friend Micca Campbell was the one who introduced me to Andy Stanley’s book Communicating for a ChangeI’m a huge personal fan of his methods for speakers, and I recommend it to every speaker I know. In the book, Stanley advocates for one main point around which you wrap the rest of the message. I previously might have 10 main points I wanted to get across!

He also teaches a very linear outline that makes sense to my brain. Using the outline keeps me on track and helps me to internalize my message from one section to the next. I don’t think every message from every speaker has to follow the same outline, but the book contains elements of effective communication that I think can improve any message and help the speaker with a memorable format.

Lastly, I also think we’re more sensitive to the little “trips” that cause panic for us (I’m in the same boat, girl!) than the audience is. Last week at my event, I felt really tongue tied and like I tripped over myself a lot. The group gave me lots of “When you said ________, I realized I needed to __________” comments, though, which are the ones I hear when I know the message has really hit hearts. Those are the comments I love! I decided that I might not have had the flow and eloquence I was shooting for, but God used the content to speak to women. Even though I wanted to critique myself harshly, I made myself stop, thank God, and move on.

Anybody else have thoughts or ideas for Amanda and the group? We’d love to learn from you!

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Monday, February 1, 2016

Reader Question 2

Today we’ve got a new question, and it’s a good one too. If you have any wisdom to share, I’d love for you to add it to mine by leaving a comment! Here we go…

Last year I felt what I think was a call to go into Christian speaking. I already speak extensively for my secular job, in fact I leave in the morning for a few days teaching in Illinois.

I have some fears about moving forward – finances, first steps, etc. My biggest fear, however, is that I’m being ambitious rather than really hearing God. The call felt strong and clear, but I didn’t feel any specific direction at that point. In fact, I felt a distinct impression that God was preparing me. Usually this would make me antsy, as I’m rather impulsive, but it felt ok.

Now I feel like I should do something, but I have no idea what and I’m wondering if I was just being presumptuous. Now that I think about it, maybe God was “calming me down” before I moved forward. Any guidance for these mixed feelings and moving forward?  ~Michelle

Oh, goodness. I’ve traveled this journey myself. For me, the first round of wanting to be a speaker was truly ambition. It was easily identifiable for me because of the things it evoked– covetousness of what a specific speaker had, jealousy over her opportunities, the desire to be up front, the craving for affirmation. These were my overwhelming feelings, so there was no doubt that my motives were warped. I prayed for God to remove the desire to speak, and He did. I served contentedly in the ministry I had been given for several years after that.

Years later, I began to believe that God was giving me a desire to speak, but I was afraid it was the old motives again. Over time, I realized that it was very different. I felt a passion to share the messages God had given me, but I had been humbled by the years and wanted to serve. Amazingly (why am I always amazed when God moves?!), He also began opening doors, and I had multiple opportunities to speak.

For Michelle and all who are struggling with calling, here are some questions to ask yourself:

  • Why do I want to speak? Is it for applause, affirmation, or acceptance? Or is it to serve my audience?
  • What’s my end goal as a speaker? Do I want to stand in front of thousands like Beth Moore? Or am I willing to speak to the five that show up?
  • How do I think I’m going to become a speaker? By being discovered and asked to join the Deeper Still team? By years of hard work with little to show except a stack of Starbucks cards and a sunroom full of potted plants?

I think the answers for true calling are probably obvious. :)

Don’t get me wrong. I think most of us start by staring up at Beth Moore or Lysa TerKeurst or Christine Caine on a stage and thinking, “I want to do what she does.” However, if we don’t move quickly beyond that to being willing to serve wherever God calls, then we need to look at motives. (And probably do a little reality check. Sorry. Just sayin’.)

So what are the ways that we can be sure we’re called?  Here are some essentials to calling:

  1. It’s consistent. Our callings must be consistent with scripture. Anytime what we think we’re hearing from God contradicts scriptures, our perceptions are incorrect. But if scripture supports our calling, then that’s one “check!” on your list.
  2. It’s confirmed. A second way to know that you’re calling is sure is if others affirm it and circumstances start to fall into place. If you are called to speak, at some point, you will be asked to speak. Michelle, you mentioned preparation, and I think that’s key.blue door I’ve watched many women prepare even though they’ve never been asked to one event only to have God open doors soon after. That’s so cool to see happen! Also, there will be some naysayers out there, but most of the godly people who live by scripture and love you should affirm your calling. If everybody is telling you differently than what you think, that’s a reason to step back and take another look.
  3. It’s in-conceivable. If your calling seems easily achievable to you in your own strengths, abilities, and talents, then it might not be from God. God’s callings often seem inconceivable to us, and that’s a good thing. It makes us depend on Him.

Hopefully, this answer gives you lots of room for soul searching. Michelle, I can’t tell you for sure if you’re called, but there is an element of your question that encourages me. People who never question their own motives or calling worry me. Often that hyper-confidence spells trouble. The fact that you’re actually examining your heart and motives is a very good sign! Keep seeking God’s direction, and I have no doubt that He’ll reveal it to you in time.

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Monday, January 25, 2016

Reader Question 1

It was so nice to see your questions popping into my email box this week. This Q & A series may spur some of your own, so keep ’em coming! My email is amy@proverbs31.org. I’ll make this an open-ended series until we run out of questions.

Here’s the first question..

I am a new Christian Speaker and Author. I am a Christian of 5 years, who has been intentional about following God for the past 2 years. I am 45 years old.

There is no doubt in my mind that God is leading me to write and speak. He created me with natural talents for both, and He has given me many examples of His power to share with others.

My question is how to put myself out there to speak in venues other than my own church? I find it difficult to “convince” others I have a firm grounding in my faith that Jesus is Lord, God is Our Father and His Spirit lives in me.  Others who hear I have had a late in life conversion experience want some tangible evidence that I am true to my word!  ~Julie

I found this an interesting question. I think there are actually 2 questions embedded within the one. The one I’ll reword and handle first is–Do I need to be spiritually mature to be a speaker?

My short answer is yes. I believe spiritual maturity is very important for a speaker, and for me, one of the greatest indicators for maturity is knowing that God’s thoughts are higher than our thoughts and His ways higher than our ways. When you listen to spiritually immature people express themselves, there’s usually lots of opinion and overly-high esteem for themselves. A spiritually mature person is marked by humility and a high value on scripture.

Having said all that, there’s not always a direct correlation between the number of years you’ve been a Christian and your spiritual maturity. I’ve known people who have been believers for decades who are very immature in their faith. These are people who haven’t invested in the spiritual disciplines or much self-discipline.

Conversely, I can think of two personal friends who became Christians as adults who, because of their passion and discipline, grew into maturity with shocking speed. I was personally convicted to see what God can do with a life that’s completely surrendered to Him.

Julie, if you have surrendered and matured quickly, I would say you’re qualified. Not only that, but you have a very unique platform. You have rare insight into how God works in an adult’s life not only to save but to transform. That’s powerful stuff for you to share!

Since you are young in spiritual years, this scripture immediately popped to mind when I read your question. I hope it encourages you! (Claire the wonder-intern made it especially for you!)

young

The second question is this– How much information is enough when we’re communicating with event planners?

I don’t mean that any speaker should hide things and certainly not that we should lie. However, we do have to decide what is important to share on marketing pieces like biosheets. Often, our life experiences can be mentioned as credentials as well as letting event planners know a little about our background. Julie, I suggest that you create a biosheet and write this information something like this…

Julie’s late-in-life connection to Jesus has allowed her the rare ability to give her audiences insight into their unchurched friends’ minds.

See how that works? What people have considered a negative isn’t hidden, yet you’ve just allowed people to view the positives that come with your experience. Speakers who are divorced, single moms, or have other challenging parts of their pasts should ask themselves this question. What did I learn in that season that could be valuable to my audience? Weave the two together and you have magic instead of a liability.

Tune in next week, for question #2!

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Monday, January 18, 2016

Questions Are Welcome

 

I’ll bet you wondered why you got two blog posts from me last week. Well… that would be because my fuzzy, post-Christmas brain is still re-acclimating to work. The second one was supposed to come to you today, but I hit “publish” instead of “schedule”.

And I was so proud of being 2 weeks ahead. Sigh.

Anyhoo… I thought I’d take this opportunity to say that I’d love to hear from you. What’s bugging you that you’d like to see addressed here? What speaking problems do you have that you’d like to hear another perspective? What questions do you have that are begging for an answer?

If you’d either put your answers to those questions in the comments or email them to amy@proverbs31.org, I’d love to address them right here in our speaker community. It’s a safe place here–Fire away!

 

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Tuesday, January 12, 2016

What’s My Job (And What’s Not)

 

Marketing our messages is one of those areas that most women in ministry hate. I sure have in the past, and my guess is that you’ve struggled too.

There are lines between what’s acceptable both as a professional and as a Christian, but it’s hard to know exactly where they are. That’s what’s so angst-producing for most of us!

When is it ok to get the word out, and when have we crossed over into self-promotion?

When is it ok to “knock on doors” of opportunity, and when have we converted to knocking doors down?

When should we promote our messages, and when should we be silent to receive a new message?

These are hard questions, and I actually think that the answers are not the same for all of us all the time. There are some clear scriptural imperatives, but God didn’t say anything about how often I should post on social networks. How do we know when we’ve crossed a line then?

Our heart condition reveals when we have mixed marketing motives.

for the marriage of (1)

 

Just this week, I realized that I was off kilter when I took my heart’s “temperature”. Instead of peace, it was filled with anxiety. Instead of trust, it was filled with doubt. Instead of confidence, it was filled with fear.

Anxiety, doubt, and fear are never the results when God is in control. They are almost always an indicator that I’ve crossed the border into God’s territory.

Lysa TerKeurst has said something that always helps me stay in my boundaries. She says, “I feel responsible to do all that I can do and to trust God to do what only He can do.” This week I realized all my negative emotions came into play when I started feeling responsible for what only God can do.

We can write a message, but only God can open the door for it to be delivered.

We can build a website, but only God can draw subscribers.

We can write a book, but only God can move people to buy them.

Are there tasks of obedience we can do to work alongside God? Of course! But that’s different than taking responsibility for the results.

When I wrote Breaking Up with Perfect last year, I promised myself that in the marketing realm I’d do just what God spoke to me and not a bit more. Work done in our own strength is simply disobedience after all and not productive! Unfortunately, my heart’s anxiety, doubt, and fear told me that I had broken that promise.

Starting Feb. 1st, I’m going to fast for 30 days to recalibrate my heart’s motives and methods. I’m not sure exactly what it’s going to look like yet, but I’m sure that I’ll fast from new marketing tasks for a month. I’m also going to implement a spiritual discipline or two to make sure that freed-up time is spent with God. I might also fast from social networks.

Why all of this? I need to move my heart back to a place of rest and trust. A place that knows God is in control of results no matter whether they’re the ones I hoped for or expected. A place of knowing my job and respecting God’s.

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Tuesday, January 12, 2016

I’m Not Sure You Can Really Help Me

 

Although I love speaking, I love coaching even more, so when I hear about my former clients’ successes, it’s thrills my soul.

If you’ve been thinking about possibly hiring me as a coach, but you’re on the fence, these stories will give you a little glimpse of how others have experienced coaching.

From Nanette…

The Problem: When I first talked to Nanette, I realized she was an experienced speaker, but she had two issues. She wasn’t sure how to narrow and define her ministry niche. Also, her speaking experience came from the corporate world, and she needed some help on transitioning into faith-based speaking.

The Solution: After talking through Nanette’s experiences and passions, she and I worked together to

  • Create an engaging tagline that described her ministry niche.
  • Develop a “signature message” that allowed her to share from a biblical foundation combined her her personal experience.

The Results:

Here’s what followed in Nanette’s own words (used with her permission)…

Nanette-0007“I had the opportunity in late October to speak (and facilitate) a 90-minute session with an international group of 250+ women representing Dress for Success affiliates around the globe at the organization’s worldwide conference in Charlotte. While it was a secular presentation I was able to incorporate some of what I learned working with you, and to infuse a Christian ‘other-centeredness’ in the information I shared. The feedback I received was extremely positive and the experience was SO rewarding!

That morning I got on my knees and prayed for God to give me composure so that my message could be heard and so the focus would not be on me but on the message. I have to tell you that I have never felt SO calm presenting in my life. It was a real milestone for me personally because God used it to heal me of anxiety around presenting that developed in my last corporate job. I used to love it and came to really fear it. Now I love it once again!

You have given me tools and skills that helped me to create great content and deliver it with confidence. SO grateful to you, Amy!”

~Nanette Kirsch, speaker and blogger at Faith Runner

From Amy B…

Problem: Amy is an accomplished and confident blogger with a year-old podcast. Because she has felt God calling her to speak, she attended She Speaks last year but still felt shaky about standing in front of an audience for the first time. During one conversation about a scripture she had chosen, I realized how much Amy had inside of her if only she had the confidence of a cohesive message in-hand.

The Solution:

Amy worked hard to develop an amazing message around a scripture God had been using in her life, and I gave her guidance about staying focused and organized in her message. She was ready for an opportunity, and the invite to speak at her church’s youth retreat happened the very week we finished her message! We did another coaching service together to brain-storm and polish the messages she created for the retreat.

The Results:

Here’s what Amy shared with me and allowed me to share with you. It sounds like an incredible weekend–starting with a video teaching she created for their Friday night gathering.

amy b“Friday’s session with the varied topics about how God created us, chose us, etc was a near bust when I recorded it with my dog (remember she was in the intro?) and then she kept wanting in and out of the room. I had to edit the video where I was doing that and thought it would ruin everything, but as it turns out the girls LOVED those moments and said it felt very real.

Saturday when I showed up everyone was genuinely excited to have me there–I think it was actually kind of cool for them to see the video of me Friday night and then see me in person the next day.

Saturday morning was the session I was most nervous about and it ended up being the best out of all of them.  I was able to pracitially teach how to remain by read, pray and obey. I had one of the older girls come up to me afterwards and say it was so awesome. She has ADD and she can’t normally pay attention but she did. Many great, deep conversations were started in their small groups after that.

After the weekend, I heard all kinds of wonderful feedback–phenomenal, awesome, etc.

I know so much of that is the Holy Spirit stirring in them as they hear God’s word, but also, I appreciate your help helping me organize it for them to hear it clearly. The interactive stuff on Saturday morning really made the whole weekend.

Thank you again for your help–keep doing what you’re doing.”

~Amy Bennett, Speaker, blogger and host of Feathers podcast

Thanks so much, Nanette and Amy, for letting me know how God is using your gift and allowing me to share here!  If you’d like to do a FREE consultation to talk to me about how I might be able to help your speaking ministry grow, click here to fill out the form. I’ll be back with you as quickly as I can!
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Tuesday, January 5, 2016

Sixteen Ways to Grow Your Speaking Ministry in 2016

 

It’s a new year, so let’s start well with a fresh beginning! Speaking is a never-ending learning curve of always stretching to communicate in a clearer, more compelling way. No matter where you are in your speaking–a beginner or a seasoned veteran– you can take tangible steps to grow your speaking ministry. Here are my top sixteen tips for 2016:

1. Spend a day (or as much time as you can carve out) in a quiet place with just your Bible and a journal. Worship, pray and read God’s Word. Ask Him to speak to you about His agenda for you for the year. Read this blog post for more details about a retreat with Jesus.

2. Pray before you speak, “Lord, help me to love You first and to love these women as you love them.” Watch your focus change and your nerves subside.

3. Lay aside a percentage of each of your speaking fees for reinvestment back into your ministry.

4. Purchase a book that will challenge you in your speaking and implement at least one new idea in your next message. We’ve got some great suggestions in our reading list on the sidebar! I’ve gotten half way through Platform by Michael Hyatt and Resonate by Nancy Duarte. Finishing them and implementing what I learn is at the top of my personal list.

5. Schedule time each week to work on your speaking ministry–studying, writing new messages or working on marketing tasks. Put it on your calendar and protect the time!

6. Seek out someone who lives very differently than you as a friend. One of the ways God is expanding my horizons and teaching me new things is through some friends who do ministry in different arenas as well as two friends who live with significant handicaps. These friendships and the lessons we learn through them impact our messages significantly.

7. Start saving your pennies and attend She Speaks. It’s a feast for your mind and soul! Registration will open early March. You can go the website today to sign up for an email alert when registration opens.

8. Prayerfully set a goal for how many times you’ll speak this year. Be open to all kinds of venues for speaking (including making announcements, emceeing events, teaching Sunday school, etc), and speak as often as possible. Pray for chances to share God’s message and exercise your “speaking muscle”.

9. Record yourself (digital recorders are worth the investment) or ask to be recorded each time you speak. Then listen to yourself! I know it’s excruciating, but you’ll identify more needs for improvement by doing this than by any other single thing.  Video is even better (worse?).  Watching yourself will alert you to areas that need work.

10. Create an updated sample speaking video for your website this year. I went years and years without a video on my website until a friend of mine who is an event planner said, “I would never hire a speaker without seeing a sample video!” It should be short and contain your best moments. Click here and scroll down a little to watch the video a friend produced for me last year.

11. Subscribe to blogs that will give you information about being a better speaker and getting the word out about your ministry. We’d love for you to subscribe here for our free weekly speaker tips, of course!  We also have additional information posted on our Facebook page.   Also, I recommend Micheal Hyatt’s blog as well as signing up for Rob Eager’s Monday Morning Marketing Tips.

12.  Listen to great speakers and analyze the structure of their messages.  There are tons of free podcasts.  A few of my favorites are any of my Proverbs 31 sisters, Jennifer Rothschild, Andy Stanley and Ravi Zacharias.

13. Watch TED Talks to fill your mind with challenging ideas and the opportunity to listen to some fabulous speakers. Here are a few of my favorites: Mandisa, Diana Nyad, Bill Gates, Jane Fonda and my all-time favorite, genius TED Talk by Jane McGonigal.

14. Choose 12 of Tracie’s marketing ideas, and implement one each month this year.

15. Get out and live a bigger life. Take a day-trip. Ride your bike. Play with children. Cook international food. Break out of your rut, and do something different! Not only will it energize you, it will give you material for your messages.

16. And last but not least…use Next Step Speaker Services to help you individually with message development, message evaluation or developing marketing pieces. If you’d like to schedule a FREE CONSULTATION CALL click here

I’m here to be your cheerleader for all of 2016! I’m in this growth process right along with you, so let’s take some next steps together.

Will you use any of these tips? I’d love to hear your thoughts if you’re planning your speaking year!

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Tuesday, December 1, 2015

A Winter Break

 

I hope you had a wonderful Thanksgiving and are heading into a Christmas season full of joy.

We’re friends here, right? I know it’s crazy since I’ve never seen most of you face to face, but I truly feel like I’m writing to a circle of friends every week. I guess that’s just one of the many benefits of being sisters with the same calling. God knits our hearts together.

Anyhoo… I know I’m waxing all smooshy on you, but I couldn’t knock off my blogging for December without saying good-bye until 2016. The truth is that I just can’t keep all the wheels on and keep up the blogging both here and on my personal blog over the holidays. I’d love for us to keep in touch this month, though. Click here to get in on some social media fun with me over at my personal ministry blog! (The whole deal will be rolled out next Monday if you want to subscribe.)

I’ll be back in January with new vim, vigor and fresh ideas. Until then, Merry Christmas, y’all!

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Tuesday, November 17, 2015

Overcoming Stage Fright

 

“Do you still get nervous?” As a speaker, that’s the most commonly asked question I get. The answer is both yes and no. Time and experience has helped me to manage my nerves, but I wouldn’t say they’re completely gone. I get more nervous in certain settings, like when people I know, love and respect are in the audience. It may be weird, but I’m more comfortable in front of 500 strangers than 20 of my friends!

It’s completely normal to get nervous before you speak, but nobody wants to melt down completely in front of a group. Here are some tips for managing and channeling fear.

#1–Be prepared with a great message. The greatest surge of confidence comes when you know you’ve written a stronge message that will serve the needs of your audience. Also, when you’ve taken time to practice that message out loud–making sure you’re staying within your given time and working out the kinks– you’ll feel calmer and more comfortable as you start.

I’ve started crafting and memorizing my first sentence. Just like writers need a great sentence as a “hook” for their readers, speakers need a beginning sentence with some “pow!” to get their listeners to sit up and begin to take notice. Knowing what my first words will be helps me to channel all the nervousness into a contagious energy.

#2–Square breathing. This physical exercise is one I use almost every time I speak. When I start getting nervous, I start to hyperventilate, so I do these steps called square breathing:

  • While counting to 4, inhale slowly through your nose.
  • Hold the breath for 4 slow counts.
  • Exhale slowly through your mouth while counting to 4.
  • Hold the breath for 4 slow counts.
  • Repeat 2-3 times.

I think this works for several reasons.  It makes me slow my breathing down which keeps me from hyperventilating.  It floods my body with oxygen which helps clear and sharpen my mind.  It also gives my brain something to do (counting) besides thinking about how nervous I am!

#3–Boss around your motives. No matter how selfless you are, it’s hard to get past wanting to impress people in your audience. I’ve found that wanting to impress is a motive that causes my nerves to soar. Instead, God has taught me to pray to forget about myself entirely. I pray that I’ll love God first and that He’ll give me a great love for the people in my audience. Once those motives and priorities are in place, my nerves calm.

Excessive nervousness when you speak reflects an excessive focus on self.

PSALM 34-4

How do you manage your nerves? I’d love to hear more tips!

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Thursday, November 12, 2015

Love is the Thing

To my dismay, it happened again this weekend. An event planner and even an attendee recounted tale after tale of aloof speakers to me. I know I’m on a roll about this topic, but really, it’s disturbing me.

I’m a speaker, so I’ll lead this little chant. You follow.

I’m the speaker…

But I’m nothing special.

My position on the stage doesn’t set me apart or make me exceptional.

I’m a regular girl…

In dire need of grace.

The end.

I know I’m getting preachy here, and this will be my last rant. But y’all, this deal of reinforcing a celebrity culture in the church has to stop. NOW. We can start the beginning of the end by not setting ourselves apart at events and coming as a humble servant. Circulate. Make yourself available. Be the first one there and the last to leave. Eat meals with the crowd. Ask them about their lives and stories. Be one of the girls.

Love is the thing. It’s the place where our hearts are set right, and we see ourselves as we are. Love compels us to pour ourselves out instead of protecting ourselves.

I know and love speakers, so I really don’t believe that being a diva is where most of this is coming from. I’m in the trenches with you, so I know how exhausting it is to stay totally engaged for days on end. I know that ministry can attract needy, boundary-less people who make you want to run away and hide. I get it. Really I do.

But we can’t let any of those be excuses that keep us from pouring out our whole selves. Jesus faced all those challenges, and yet He gave Himself completely and humbly to us. How can we do less?

Let’s spread the love today– as a start into our cyber worlds with the graphics below and then pray to take it into our every day worlds. My Wunderkind–Claire the intern and Jake the techie guy–have put together beautiful graphics and whiz-bang technology to make it easy to share. Just run your cursor over the image you like, pick your poison, click and VOILA!

If you promise to spread the love at your events and be one of the girls, I promise to quit preaching. :) Love you! Really!

 

Love one another.as I have loved you,You must loveOne Another. (2)

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The (1)

Espresso Shot (1)

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Honeycomb

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